IT'S EDIBLE - random recipe thread

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by CRUDS, Aug 2, 2007.

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  1. RollTide

    RollTide All-Pro

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    Cajuntitan no!

    That's why this thread was created, as a means of getting your mammas secret cajun recipes! Come on dude tell us how much cayenne she puts cornmeal for the catfish.

    This thread needs some cajun input!
    #11
  2. Gunny

    Gunny Lord and Master Tip Jar Donor

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    what the hell is Gumbo?
    #12
  3. RollTide

    RollTide All-Pro

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    Blakening..

    Paul Prudhomme first started doing that while the executive chef at the commander's palace in the 70s. Because it is a modern technique i'm automatically adverse to it. To do it right only that absolute outer 1/100th of a centimeter of spices should actually be burnt. The fish itself should under no circumstances taste burnt. You seal the fish with the crispy outer layer of spices. It's not cheap either because you need a lot of dry spices..

    Most people don't do it right and much of the time the result is a greasy, burnt mess which is a horrible way to treat a fresh piece of fish.. Even lu lu's in gulf shores doesn't really get it right..


    Personally i just prefer crispy fried fish..
    #13
  4. RollTide

    RollTide All-Pro

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    Avvie..

    I will probably never eat emerill's food and do not own one of his cookbooks but this man was actually recruited to be the chef at the commander's palace by the brennens and was the executive chef there 7 1/2 years. I would hope the former executive chef at commander's palace would know gumbo.
    #14
  5. RollTide

    RollTide All-Pro

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    Zydeco hen(or chicken)..

    The idea is to slowly stew the hen in this rich very dark roux with lots of spices. This is a creole version a more traditional cajun version wouldn't have the tomatoes or the worcestershire sauce.

    Start with a nice hen cut into pieces and one cup of red roux.

    Heat 2-3 tablespoons of shortening in a frying pan until almost smoking, pan fry the hen pieces until golden brown and remove. Then add just under a 1/2 cup of additional shortening to the pan and again bring it to the point of almost smoking. Then slowly add a full 1/2 cup of all purpose flour stirring constantly with a whisk if you have one. Turn the heat down to 33% and continue to stir regularly for as long as it takes to get the roux to a halfway between peanut butter and coffee. So at least as dark as peanut butter.

    Add to the finished roux these diced vegetables- one large onion- one large green pepper- 3-4 celery stalks-one jalapeno pepper-one medium carrot. Again finely diced, these veggies are for flavor and color. Add the veggies to the roux, turn up the heat to medium and simmer until they are getting soft.

    Next add one large can(28 oz) stewed tomatoes with juice, 2 tablespoons worcestershire, one tablespoon hot sauce(your choice) and one tablespoon tony chachere's creole seasoning. Sir the ingrediants into the roux until fully incorporated and add the hen pieces, cover and simmer for at least 2 hours and serve hen pieces smothered with gravy over rice. White rice! Not confetti pasta or some crap.

    At first the roux with the tomatoes will seem way too thick but over time cooking causes a roux to lose it's thinkening ability if that makes sense. Also the juices from the hen will combine with the gravy. That's why this is all so damn good. Right after cooking taste and add seasoning salt, pepper and hot sauce to taste..
    #15
  6. Broken Record

    Broken Record Biscuit Eater Staff

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    I can't cook for ****, but here is my very special recipe for whiskey sours.

    Ingredients:
    A fifth of whiskey, preferably something 100 proof or higher

    [​IMG]

    Country Time Lemonade Powdered Mix

    [​IMG]

    Fill an empty gallon jug with tap water about 2/3rds of the way to the top. Pour in twice as much country time powder as the container calls for. Place the top tightly back on the gallon jug. Shake vigorously. Place in refrigerator if desired, but I usually don't have time for all that.

    Fill a 3 oz shot glass with the whiskey as full as you can handle without spilling (of course).

    Now, here's the tricky, and most important part... shoot the whiskey, then quickly chase with the lemonade mixture straight from the jug.

    Voila! You've done it! Repeat final step as necessary.

    This recipe has been tinkered with over the years to its current state of perfection.
    #16
  7. cajuntitan

    cajuntitan 26.2ers can do it for hrs

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    RollTide,

    That is def. a creole version. Here on the other side of the state we do it a bit different.

    You start by boiling about 1 gallon of water in a stock pot. when the water boils you add your cut up chicken and let it cook till done. Take the water (now stock) and the chicken off the heat and let it cool. While it cools you make a roux. We use equal parts veg. oil and flour (1 Cup of each) brown it till it is a bit darker than peanut butter. After it cool enough we then pour the stock of the chicken but reserve it. At this point you can either pick the chicken or leave it on the bone (I prefer to pick the chicken). In your stock pot you add a stick of butter and 2 cups of onion, 1 cup of bellpepper, 3-4 stallks of cellery, and 3-4 cloves of minced garllic (no carrots or tomatos). Saute that down untill the onions are translucent. Add to the stock pot your chicken stock, the roux, the chicken and seasoning (salt, pepper, creole seasoning and tobasco) and cook for about an hour. Then add smoked andouie sausage and cook for about another 30 min to an hour. If you can stand it, it is much better if you don't eat it till the next day. Put it in the fridge and warm it up the next day. Add salt, pepper, and tobasco again to taste. Eat it over rice with a side of potato salad.

    You also don't have to use chicken! Instead you can use just about anything you can imagine. Another popular version is seafood gumbo. Instead of chicken, chicken stock and sausage, I use a gallon of water with a lobster base that I buy at the grocery store (about 2 Tbs to a gallon of water) to make my seafood stock. you do everything else the same but add your seafood in the last 30min to an hour. Some of the seafood we use is shrimp, crawfish, oysters and crabs (in or out of the shell). We use these items either by themselves or any combo including everyone of them.

    Some others meats used include duck, goose, squirell (sp) & turtle.
    #17
  8. TitanJeff

    TitanJeff Kahuna Grande Staff

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    I think a trip to Bro's is coming on.
    #18
  9. RollTide

    RollTide All-Pro

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    Cajun..

    Nice recipe and it can be more like a soup(gumbo) or a gravy depending on how much stock you make. Adding spicy sausages to my recipe would be a good idea. Spicy creole sausage, chaurice or andoullie.

    Carrots are not either cajun or creole but they are absolutely french. Just like the cajun trinity of onions-peppers-celery the french have a trinity of onions-celery-carrots called mirapoix. I just combine them and they add flavor, color and vitamin A.


    I know you probably don't make jambalaya with tomatoes either do you? But dude jambalaya is a creole dish originally.

    I am actually planning a trip to southern louisiana that would not include new orleans or baton rouge either. I would go to lafayette and nearby environs, breau bridge and get a nice idea about cajun lifestyle and food. I think that would be fun..
    #19
  10. cajuntitan

    cajuntitan 26.2ers can do it for hrs

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    Tide,

    I have eaten Jambalaya both ways and prefer the tomato version better. Lafayette and the surrounding areas are great. I live about an hour west of there. One cool thing about lake charles is that it has more festivals than any other city in LA. There is more often than not something going on in this town that revolves around cooking.

    Here check it out, so if you are ever in the area. We also have a couple of casinos if that is your thing. The city just aproved a riverboat licence to one of the existing casinos. They are planing a major casino project in the near future. They also are about to do some major development along our lake front. This stuff is long over due and it will probably bring in alot of new buisness in near future. Things look pretty good for our little town.

    http://www.cityoflakecharles.com/
    #20
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